Review: Tom Clancy Duty and Honor by Grant Blackwood, read by Scott Brick

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51U2MJMrHdLFirst, please let me get this out of the way! This shouldn’t be a Tom Clancy book, it doesn’t deserve to wear that name, the only reason I listened until the end was because of the great performance delivered by Scott Brick. 

I am a very big Clancy fan, I listened to all of his books, the old ones were performed by Michael Prichard, than by Scott Brick and a few by Lou Diamond Phillips, I loved them, those written by Mr. Clancy and also those by Mark Greaney, sadly, with all due respect, Grant Blackwood can’t reach that level of sophistication in storytelling or of planning a complex plot. He is not a bad writer, but when you sign up to use a name like Tom Clancy you have to deliver something better than Duty and Honor. I understand that Grant Blackwood is a New York Times best selling author and I even enjoyed some of his previous works, but this one is really sad. Again, I say this with all due respect… I don’t intended to offend anyone.

I had the same problem with the latest Clive Cussler books as well and with a few that wear the name Robert Ludlum. I think that if you are not good enough to write something resembling the original work, you should invent your own characters and not make storytelling just a business… It’s not right…

Well, I had to say all that and now let me get back to the actual review…

Duty and Honor follows the ”adventures” of Jack Ryan Jr, the son of the President of the United States of America. After a murder attempt is made on his life, Jack jr. tries to discover why someone wants him dead. Beyond this point, the story is driven by a really weak plot, touching on terrorism, while the action moves from the US to Germany and to a few more countries, but there’s nothing spectacular or interesting happening. I guess that if we took out Jack Ryan Jr and replaced him with a different name the expectations wouldn’t be so high and this Duty and Honor book could have been a decent thriller, but by using the Tom Clancy trademark the bar was raised very high.

The beginning was promising, but after that everything became boring. The only good things in this book are some interesting trivia facts and a few descriptions for places where Jack travels, but that’s not enough.

The audiobook version is around 9 hours long, with the excellent Scott Brick at the helm. As I said above, he kept me going until the end of the story although the plot didn’t made me curious at all. Yes, Scott has that power, to make a bad book bearable… As always, he gives life to all the characters, using different accents to keep the them easily differentiated in the listeners mind. Scott Brick is one of the best voice over artists and narrators out there!

51U2MJMrHdL

 

Author: Grant Blackwood

Narrator: Scott Brick

Genre: Thriller

Duration: 9 Hours, 14 Minutes

Series: The Jack Ryan Universe, book 21

 

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About the Author

The New York Times bestselling author of the Briggs Tanner series, (END OF ENEMIES, WALL OF NIGHT, and ECHO OF WAR) Grant Blackwood is also the co-author of the Fargo Adventure Series (SPARTAN GOLD, LOST EMPIRE, and THE KINGDOM) with Clive Cussler, as well as the co-author of the #1 NYT bestseller, DEAD OR ALIVE, with Tom Clancy, and the upcoming thriller, THE KILL SWITCH, with James Rollins.

Publisher’s Summary
Even though he’s on forced leave from the clandestine intelligence group known as The Campus, Jack Ryan, Jr., still finds himself caught in the crosshairs after an attempt on his life is thwarted when he turns the tables on his would-be dispatcher. Convinced that the attack is linked to his recent covert actions with the convalescing Iranian national Ysabel Kashini, Jack sets out to find out who wants him dead – and why.

Using clues found on the now dead assassin, Jack pursues the investigation, following a growing trail of corpses to the European Union’s premier private security firm, Rostock Security Group, and its founder, Jürgen Rostock – a former general in the German Special Forces Command. Rostock is world renowned as a philanthropist and human rights advocate. But Jack knows him from a Campus mission revolving around a company linked to RSG – a mission that has put him on Rostock’s lethal radar.

Without any Campus resources, Jack launches his own shadow campaign to uncover the truth about Rostock and a long-running false-flag war of terror that has claimed thousands of lives. Yet all of that bloodshed is but a precursor to a coming catastrophic event that will solidify Rostock’s place among the global powers – an event that Jack must stop at any cost.

Tom Clancy Duty and Honor by Grant Blackwood

$28.74
Tom Clancy Duty and Honor by Grant Blackwood
6.66666666667

Overall

5/10

    Performance

    10/10

      Story

      5/10

        Pros

        • Perfect narration by Scott Brick

        Cons

        • Not worthy to wear the Tom Clancy name
        • Boring
        • Not interesting
        • Not a Jack Ryan book
        • Doesn't bring anything new to the series
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        I am an avid Audiobook listener. I started Audiobooknews.club to celebrate the industry's Golden Voices and to review my favorite books. Audiobooks represent a huge part of my life. I love the industry, the writers and the amazing narrators.

        One thought on “Review: Tom Clancy Duty and Honor by Grant Blackwood, read by Scott Brick”

        1. C. Mosby Miller says:

          Personally, if I weren’t so lazy, I would initiate a class-action lawsuit against all publishers who use the name of a dead or authorize inactive but famous author to promote a book. My God, the font used in Clancy’s name in Duty and Honor is bigger than the name of the book, itself! And the actual writer, what’s-his-name can barely be seen.

          Of course, there is also those semi-retired authors who want us to believe that they co-wrote a novel with other what’s-their-names when the amount of their actual contribute is, at best, unknown.

          We use to call these tactics deceit. Even fraud. Today, it’s just the way to do business in the publishing world.

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